Hello Cherubs World

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Hello Cherubs!

Hello Cherubs World, is an article about a type of supernatural being in the Bible. For winged babies in artwork, see putto. For other uses, see Cherub (disambiguation).

Cherubs; (/ˈtʃɛrəb/;[1] also pl. cherubim; Hebrew כְּרוּב, pl. כְּרוּבִים, English trans kərūv, pl. kərūvîm, dual kərūvāyim; Latin cherub, pl. cherubin, cherubim; Syriac ܟܪܘܒܐ), is a winged angelic being who is considered to attend on the Abrahamic God in biblical tradition. Hello Cherubs World, The concept is represented in ancient Middle Eastern art as a lion or bull with eagles’ wings and a human face, and regarded in traditional Christian angelology as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy.[2]   Cherubim are mentioned throughout the Hebrew Bible and once in the New Testament in reference to the mercy seat of the Ark of the Covenant (Hebrews 9:5).

Origins

Hello Cherubs World

A pair of shedu, protecting a doorway (the body of the creatures extending into the distance)

The Hebrew term cherubim is cognate with the Assyrian term karabu, Akkadian term kuribu, and Babylonian term karabu; the Assyrian term means ‘great, mighty’, but the Akkadian and Babylonian cognates mean ‘propitious, blessed’.[3][4]

In some regions the Assyro-Babylonian term came to refer in particular to spirits which served the gods, in particular to the shedu (human-headed winged bulls);[4] the Assyrians sometimes referred to these as kirubu, a term grammatically related to karabu.[3]  Hello Cherubs World, They were originally a version of the shedu, protective deities sometimes found as pairs of colossal statues either side of objects to be protected, such as doorways.[4][5]

However, while the shedu were popular in Mesopotamia, archaeological remains from the Levant suggest that they were quite rare in the immediate vicinity of the Israelites.[5]  Hello Cherubs World, The related Lammasu (human-headed winged lions—to which the sphinx is similar in appearance), on the other hand, were the most popular winged-creature in Phoenician art, and so scholars suspect that cherubim were originally a form of Lammasu.[5]  In particular, in a scene reminiscent of Ezekiel’s dream, the Megiddo Ivories—ivory carvings found at Megiddo (which became a major Israelite city)—depict an unknown king being carried on his throne by hybrid winged-creatures.[6]

The Lammasu was originally depicted as having a king’s head, a bull’s body, and an eagle’s wings, but because of the artistic beauty of the wings, these rapidly became the most prominent part in imagery;[3] wings later came to be bestowed on men, thus forming the stereotypical image of an angel.[6]   The griffin—a similar creature but with an eagle’s head rather than that of a king—has also been proposed as an origin, arising in Israelite culture as a result of Hittite usage of griffins (rather than being depicted as aggressive beasts, Hittite depictions show them seated calmly, as if guarding),[6] and some have proposed that griffin may be cognate to cherubim,[7] but Lammasu were significantly more important in Levantine culture, and thus more likely to be the origin.[3]

Early Semitic tradition conceived the cherubim as guardians devoid of human feelings whose duty was to represent the gods and guard sanctuaries from intruders. , This conception is similar to an account found on Tablet 9 of the inscriptions found at Nimrud,[3] in which the cherubim, like the shedu, depicted storm deities, particularly the storm winds.[7]  Hello Cherubs World, It has been suggested that the image of cherubim as storm winds explains why they are described as being the chariot of the LORD in Ezekiel’s visions, the Books of Samuel,[8] the parallel passages in the later Book of Chronicles,[9] and passages in the early Psalms:[3] “and he rode upon a cherub and did fly: and he was seen upon the wings of the wind”.[10][11]

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About the Rococo Art Movement

3ff1bd38400a3620eb8bba2698e28035About the Rococo Art Movement ‘The Art of the Aristocracy’   The word is derived from “rocaille” (pebble), but the term referred in particular to the small stones and shells used to adorn the interiors of grottoes. Such shells or shell forms were the primary motifs in Rococo ornament. The Rococo movement was initially restricted to France, later spreading to all of Europe and above all to England. The movement continued to develop until the arrival of Neoclassicism which attempted to return to the purism of classical antiquity. Rococo art themes centered around carefree aristocrats at play in make-believe settings.
About the Rococo Art Movement: Cherubs were often included in the mix to give the work a touch of delightful whimsy.  Romantic scenes depict luxuriously costumed ladies and gentlemen flirting, picnicking and playing music at gallant country parties.  The background scenery is often a serene natural setting with delicate trees and sprays of roses. Colors are a profusion of soothing, light pastels. Famous Rocco painter, Joshua Reynolds stated “Raphael and Titian seem to have looked at Nature for different purposes; they both had the power of extending their view to the whole; but one looked only for the general effect as produced by form, the other as produced by colour.” 
About the Rococo Art Movement:  style began as a backlash against Baroque formality and stuffiness. Unlike Baroque, Rococo is not concerned with religious matters or dramatic expression. The highly decorative art and design movement began in Paris, France in the early 1700s and is sometimes called the style of Louis XV (15th) . The style is profoundly symbolic of the hedonism of the European upper-classes. Rocco manner is characterized by graceful, enchanting, lighthearted themes of flirting and unrequited, melancholic love among the aristocracy. Sentiment was expressed over reason and emotionalism was expressed over intellect. Paintings are animated and clever, reflecting an impishly sensual daydream.
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About the Rococo Art Movement:  paintings feature beautiful aristocrats decked out in velvet, elegant laces and rich golden embroideries. The figures are tall and willowy, stylish and charming. The faces are presented as soft and rosy, effeminate and eternally young. Noblemen are depicted wearing feminine coiffeurs, rouged lips and cheeks, often sporting Hello Cherubs . Family portraits are dreamy and light hearted. Servants are depicted happily serving their aristocratic employers and were often included in Hello Cherubs . The Rocco Manon Balletti are female figures delicate and light; the faces, are childish and sentimental. The lines of the mouth curve in soft mischief or in a delicate enchanting smile. 

Rococo (/rəˈkk/ or /rkəˈk/), less commonly roccoco, or “Late Baroque”, is an 18th-century artistic movement and style, affecting many aspects of the arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, interior design, decoration, literature, music, and theatre.

About the Rococo Art Movement: It developed in the early 18th century in Paris, France as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry, and strict regulations of the Baroque, especially of the Palace of Versailles. Rococo artists and architects used a more jocular, florid, and graceful approach to the Baroque. Their style was ornate and used light colours, asymmetrical designs, curves, and gold. Unlike the political Baroque, the Rococo had playful and witty themes.

About the Rococo Art Movement: The interior decoration of Rococo rooms was designed as a total work of art with elegant and ornate furniture, small sculptures, ornamental mirrors, and tapestry complementing architecture, reliefs, and wall paintings. The Rococo was also important in theatre. The book The Rococo states that no other culture “has produced a wittier, more elegant, and teasing dialogue full of elusive and camouflaging language and gestures, refined feelings and subtle criticism” than Rococo theatre, especially that of France.

About the Rococo Art Movement: By the end of the 18th century, Rococo was largely replaced by the Neoclassic style. In 1835 the Dictionary of the French Academy stated that the word Rococo “usually covers the kind of ornament, style and design associated with Louis XV’s reign and the beginning of that of Louis XVI”. It includes therefore, all types of art from around the middle of the 18th century in France. The word is seen as a combination of the French rocaille (stone) and coquilles (shell), due to reliance on these objects as decorative motifs.

About the Rococo Art Movement: The term may also be a combination of the Italian word “barocco” (an irregularly shaped pearl, possibly the source of the word “baroque”) and the French “rocaille” (a popular form of garden or interior ornamentation using shells and pebbles) and may describe the refined and fanciful style that became fashionable in parts of Europe in the 18th century. Owing to Rococo love of shell-like curves and focus on decorative arts, some critics used the term to derogatively imply that the style was frivolous or merely modish.

About the Rococo Art Movement: When the term was first used in English in about 1836, it was a colloquialism meaning “old-fashioned”. The style received harsh criticism and was seen by some to be superficial and of poor taste, especially when compared to neoclassicism; despite this, it has been praised for its aesthetic qualities, and since the mid-19th century, the term has been accepted by art historians. While there is still some debate about the historical significance of the style to art in general, Rococo is now widely recognized as a major.