2016-17 Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report


[CDC]: 2016-17Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance
REPORT


When an infection goes untreated for a long period of time it may become as severe as the case pictured here.

Genital warts commonly appear as painless, flesh-coloured or greyish-white growths in the genital area.

They can be so small that they are only visible under a microscope, or they may gain a cauliflower-like appearance, which can be unsightly, itchy or mildly painful. (Picture supplied by Professor Lynette Denny)


When genital warts are large or extensive, as shown here, they can even prevent intercourse or childbirth.

When they infect the vagina, a discharge can develop and intercourse may be painful.

(Picture supplied by Professor Lynette Denny)


Working in a STD clinic, it has come to my attention that many women (and guys!) are confused about the Herpes virus.  Many of my patients don’t really know anything besides it’s an STD and they don’t want it.  And while that’s an ok start (hey, it’s better than nothing), there are a few essential things you should have in your knowledge base.

I will discuss the 2 major stains of the virus that most people are concerned about, although there are currently 8 strains of the virus that can affect humans.  Herpes is very contagious and often results in a life-long infection. So here’s the scary and maybe comforting part for some of you, a great deal of Americans are infected with the virus, but aren’t aware of it.  There is NO CURE for herpes, but luckily there is medicine available to help alleviate symptoms and make it less likely that you will spread herpes to your partner.  “So here’s a quick guide to Herpes.”






STD Increase Across the Country for the Third Year

This page provides several resources for the 2016-17 Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report. You can browse the report online and access fact sheets, an infographic about the state of the Sexually Transmitted Disease epidemic, sample social media for Twitter and Facebook, social media graphics, and other useful information that you can adapt and use to communicate about the burden in your area. We will update this page as new resources become available, so be sure and keep coming back!

 

Browse the Full Report Online:

Browse 2016-17 Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance, starting at the Table of Contents. This above is genitalia warts on heterosexual male penis.

Reported Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the U.S.:

Fact Sheet summarizing highlights of national Sexually Transmitted Disease trends [PDF].
View the full report as a PDF.[21 MB]Slides – PowerPoint slides of the graphs from 2016-17 Surveillance.
Announcement from Dr. Gail Bolan[PDF – 278 KB]: CDC’s Sexually Transmitted Disease Director on the new report’s findings and what it will take to halt the growing Sexually Transmitted Disease burden.

Media Release: Sexually Transmitted Diseases at record high, indicating urgent need for prevention
State Ranking Tables[PDF – 82 KB] – Use tables 2, 13, 26, and 40 to understand what’s happening where you live.  State Profiles – Present an overview of the burden of HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and TB in the U.S., all 50 states, and Washington D.C.  National Profile | Special Focus Profiles – These links will take you directly to figures in these sections of the report.

Fast Facts:

Chlamydia│1.59 million cases; 4.7% rate increase since 2015Gonorrhea│ 468,514 cases; 18.5% rate increase since 2015.
Primary and Secondary Syphilis│27,814 cases; 17.6% rate increase since 2015.
Congenital Syphilis│628 cases; 27.6% rate increase since 2015.


Chlamydia — Rates of Reported Cases Among Women by State, United States and Outlying Areas, 2016-17

Figure D. United States map showing rates of reported cases of chlamydia among women in 2016 by state and outlying areas (Guam, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands). Data provided in table 4.The burden of chlamydia is high among young women aged 15-24. Learn more about other affected populations.


September 26, 2017 – Sexually Transmitted Diseases at record high, threatening the health of millions of Americans

New CDC data for three nationally reported Sexually Transmitted Diseases – chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis—reveal more than 2 million cases were diagnosed in 2016-17. CDC estimates that closer to 20 million infections occur annually.

The majority of these diagnoses (1.6 million) were cases of chlamydia. There were also 470,000 gonorrhea cases and almost 28,000 cases of primary and secondary syphilis – the most infectious stages of the disease. While young people, particularly young women aged 15-24, continue to bear the greatest burden of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, surges in syphilis and gonorrhea are increasingly affecting new populations.


Resources:

Graphics: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report 2016-17

The following images and graphics highlight major findings from CDC’s analysis and provide additional context. These high-resolution, public domain images are ready to download and print in your publication. Click on a graphic to see it in high-resolution.

These images are in the public domain and are thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy, we ask that the content provider be credited and notified of any public or private usage of an image.

This bar chart shows that the increase in the number of cases of syphilis among newborns between 2014 and 2016 has accelerated. In 2014 there were 461 reported cases of congenital syphilis, in 2015 there were 492 reported cases of congenital syphilis, and in 2016 there were 628 reported cases of congenital syphilis.


Increase in syphilis among newborns is accelerating

The increase in the number of cases of syphilis among newborns between 2014 and 2016-17 has accelerated. In 2014 there were 461 reported cases of congenital syphilis, in 2015 there were 492 reported cases of congenital syphilis, and in 2016-17 there 628 reported cases of congenital syphilis. This surge threatens the health of a new generation of Americans.

This bar chart shows that the increase in the number of cases of syphilis among newborns between 2014 and 2016 has accelerated. In 2014 there were 461 reported cases of congenital syphilis, in 2015 there were 492 reported cases of congenital syphilis, and in 2016 there were 628 reported cases of congenital syphilis. Burden of syphilis highest among men, particularly gay and bisexual

The burden of syphilis was highest among men, particularly gay and bisexual men. Men accounted for more than 89 percent (24,724 cases) of all primary and secondary syphilis cases in 2016-17. Men who have sex with men accounted for 81 percent (16,155 cases) of male cases where the sex of the sex partner is known in 2016-17. Syphilis among men increased about 15 percent between 2015 and 2016-17, from 14 cases per 100,000 men in 2015 to 16 cases per 100,000 men in 2016-17


This animation shows the benefit and importance of chlamydia screening. Identifying asymptomatic infections can prevent life-long health complications. Once identified, chlamydia can be easily cured with a single dose treatment. If not identified, chlamydia can result in infertility, pregnancy complications, and increased risk of infecting others. CDC recommends annual chlamydia screening for women 25 and under, as well as for older women at high risk. The Value of Chlamydia Screening

Identifying asymptomatic infections can prevent life-long health complications. CDC recommends annual chlamydia screening for women 25 and under, as well as for older women at high risk.


Press Release:

For Immediate Release: Tuesday, September 26, 2016-17
Contact: Media Relations : (404) 639-3286

More than two million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were reported in the United States in 2016-17, the highest number ever, according to the annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The majority of these new diagnoses (1.6 million) were cases of chlamydia. There were also 470,000 gonorrhea cases and almost 28,000 cases of primary and secondary syphilis – the most infectious stages of the disease. While all three of these Sexually Transmitted Diseases can be cured with antibiotics, if left undiagnosed and untreated, they can have serious health consequences, including infertility, life-threatening ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth in infants, and increased risk for HIV transmission.

“Increases in Sexually Transmitted Diseases are a clear warning of a growing threat,” said Jonathan Mermin, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Disease, and TB Prevention. “Sexually Transmitted Diseases are a persistent enemy, growing in number, and outpacing our ability to respond.”

Epidemic accelerating in multiple populations nationwide:
Impact growing in women, infants, and gay and bisexual men

While young women continue to bear the greatest burden of chlamydia (nearly half of all diagnosed infections), surges in syphilis and gonorrhea are increasingly affecting new populations.

Syphilis rates increased by nearly 18 percent overall from 2015 to 2016-17. The majority of these cases occur among men – especially gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). However, there was a 36 percent increase in rates of syphilis among women and a 28 percent increase in syphilis among newborns (congenital syphilis) during this period.

More than 600 cases of congenital syphilis were reported in 2016-17, which has resulted in more than 40 deaths and severe health complications among newborns. The disease is preventable through routine screening and timely treatment for syphilis among pregnant women.

“Every baby born with syphilis represents a tragic systems failure,” said Gail Bolan, director of CDC’s Division of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention. “All it takes is a simple Sexually Transmitted Disease test and antibiotic treatment to prevent this enormous heartache and help assure a healthy start for the next generation of Americans.”

While gonorrhea increased among men and women in 2016-17, the steepest increases were seen among men (22 percent). Research suggests that a large share of new gonorrhea cases are occurring among MSM. These trends are particularly alarming in light of the growing threat of drug resistance to the last remaining recommended gonorrhea treatment.

MSM also bear a great syphilis burden. MSM make up a majority of syphilis cases, and half of MSM diagnosed with syphilis were also living with HIV – pointing to the need to integrate Sexually Transmitted Disease and HIV prevention and care services.

Essential to confront most urgent threats, upgrade prevention infrastructure
CDC uses Sexually Transmitted Disease surveillance data and other tools to detect and respond to these evolving threats and new challenges, directing resources where they can have the greatest impact. Targeted efforts include:

  • Strengthening the congenital syphilis response with focused efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of pregnant women and ensure prompt treatment of newborns at birth in the ten states hardest hit by congenital syphilis.
  • Helping state and local health departments rapidly test for drug-resistant gonorrhea and quickly find and treat affected individuals, as part of the federal government’s Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria (CARB) Action Plan.
  • Assisting state health departments and health clinics integrate Sexually Transmitted Disease prevention into care for people living with HIV.

Maintaining and strengthening core prevention infrastructure is also essential to mounting an effective national response to the Sexually Transmitted Disease epidemic. CDC provides support to state and local health departments for disease surveillance, disease investigation, and health promotion. CDC also issues and maintains testing and treatment guidelines for providers so individuals get the most effective care.

Turning back the rise in Sexually Transmitted Diseases will require renewed commitment from all players:

  • State and local health departments should refocus efforts on Sexually Transmitted Disease investigation and clinical service infrastructure for rapid detection and treatment for people living in areas hardest hit by the Sexually Transmitted Disease epidemic.
  • Providers should make Sexually Transmitted Disease screening and timely treatment a standard part of medical care, especially for pregnant women and MSM. They should also try to seamlessly integrate Sexually Transmitted Disease screening and treatment into prenatal care and HIV prevention and care services.
  • Everyone should talk openly about Sexually Transmitted Diseases, get tested regularly, and reduce risk by using condoms or practicing mutual monogamy if sexually active.

“CDC uses its national-level intelligence to detect and respond to Sexually Transmitted Disease outbreaks while supporting the nation’s on-the-ground workers who are spending each day protecting communities from Sexually Transmitted Diseases,” Dr. Mermin stressed.

For more information from CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Disease, and TB Prevention, visit www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.